Posts Tagged ‘shinsplints’

Solihull Podiatrist looks at foot problems for runners in Birmingham

Saturday, June 5th, 2010

Solihull Podiatrist Peter Taylor who is based at the Atlas Sports Injury Clinic in  Hall Green Birmingham specialises in treating runners and runners feet.  With extended distance races such as the London Marathon or the half marathon in Birmingham becoming popular, high mileage training runs can take a heavy toll on runners feet and lower legs.

Running injuries such as shinsplints, blisters and achilles tendonitis are common as is a variety of conditions that give knee pain.

Peter has many years experience in diagnosing and treating these conditions and can get you back running again.

The website www.runninginjuryclinic.co.uk

will help many runners understand common injuries

Foot health care for Runners

Running / jogging is one of the most popular activities that people use to get fit, or to just simply escape the stress of everyday life.

Whether you are a serious athlete, regularly run for fitness or you are beginner, it is important that you take care of your feet.

When running, the foot and lower limb are subjected to increased stress, and overuse injuries and conditions are quite common.

If any condition becomes persistent or serious it is important to seek the help of a Podiatrist / Chiropodist.

Common injuries / conditions

Blisters

Blisters are caused by prolonged friction that produces a shearing force between the layers of skin. The layers of skin then separate and fill with fluid or sometimes blood.

Callus and corns

Callus and corns develop due to mechanical stresses on the skin. Normal skin activity is over stimulated and results in thickened layers of skin.

A callus is a diffuse area of thickened skin, when a hard nucleus of skin develops within the callus it is known as a corn. Both can become very painful if left untreated.

Excessive foot pronation

Excessive pronation, commonly known as Pes planus or flat feet is a biomechanical problem reportedly affecting around 75% of the population.

This is a condition where the feet roll inwards excessively to gain ground contact when weight bearing.

Pes planus or flat feet are commonly a congenital condition but may also be acquired due to the feet being continually subjected to impact on hard surfaces, this may then weaken ligaments, tendons and the arches of the feet.

Considering that we spend most of our lives standing/walking/running on concrete and tarmac these days, then it is hardly surprising that excessive pronation of the feet is becoming ever more common in people of all ages.

Excessive pronation can lead to many other lower limb injuries and conditions including:  plantar fasciitis, shin splints, runners knee and achilles tendonitis.